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Tangier I SP-469 - History

Tangier I SP-469 - History


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Tangier
I

(SP-469: 1. 62'0"; b. 13'6"; dr. 2'4" (mean); s. 1
a. 1 1-pdr.)

The first Tangier (SP-469)—a motor yacht built by J. Woodtull at Orvington, Va.—was acquired by the Navy from Mr. J. S. Parsons of Norfolk, Va., and was placed in commission on 24 April 1917.

Records of Tangier's service are extremely sketchy. However, it is known that she was acquired for service with the section patrol to protect the harbors and coastal waters of the United States against intrusion by German U-boats. In all probability, she patrolled the waters near Norfolk and in the lower reaches of the Chesapeake Bay because small craft so acquired usually operated in the immediate area of their acquisition. In any event, Tangier served the Navy from 24 April 1917 until 22 October 1918, at which time she was returned to her owner.


Tangier I SP-469 - History

This page covers World War I era acquired vessels numbered in the "SP" and "ID" series from SP-400 through SP-499, plus some that were given numbers but not acquired.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual ships and craft numbered in the "SP" and "ID" series from SP-400 through SP-499.

If the "SP"/"ID" vessel you want does not have an active link on this page, or the other pages of this series, and the statement "no image available" is lacking, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

World War I era acquired vessels numbered from SP-400 through SP-499:

  • ID # 400 : Walter Adams . 271 gross ton fishing vessel, 1890. USN: Walter Adams , 1918-1919
  • SP-402 : Vidofner . 27 gross ton motor boat, 1906. USN: Vidofner , 1917-1917
  • SP-403 : Helen Euphane . 178 gross ton fishing vessel, 1902. USN: Helen Euphane , 1917-1919. No image available
  • SP-406 : Vigilant . 30 gross ton motor boat, 1916. USN: Vigilant (renamed SP-406 , 1918), 1917-1918
  • SP-407 : Speedway . 15 gross ton motor boat. USN: Speedway , 1917-1919
  • SP-408 : Artmar III . 63-foot motor boat, 1912. USN: Artmar III , 1917-1919
  • SP-409 : Patrol # 2 . 40-foot motor boat, circa 1915-1916. USN: Patrol # 2 , 1917-1919

To the best of our knowledge, the pictures provided in the "Online Library of Selected Images" are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.


یواس‌اس تنگیر (اس‌پی-۴۶۹)

یواس‌اس تنگیر (اس‌پی-۴۶۹) (به انگلیسی: USS Tangier (SP-469) ) یک کشتی بود که طول آن ۶۲ فوت ۰ اینچ (۱۸٫۹۰ متر) بود.

یواس‌اس تنگیر (اس‌پی-۴۶۹)
پیشینه
مالک
به دست آورده شده: ۵ دسامبر ۱۹۱۷
اعزام: ۲۴ آوریل ۱۹۱۷
مشخصات اصلی
گنجایش: 7 gross register tons
درازا: ۶۲ فوت ۰ اینچ (۱۸٫۹۰ متر)
پهنا: ۱۳ فوت ۶ اینچ (۴٫۱۱ متر)
آبخور: ۲ فوت ۴ اینچ (۰٫۷۱ متر)
سرعت: 14 knots

این یک مقالهٔ خرد کشتی یا قایق است. می‌توانید با گسترش آن به ویکی‌پدیا کمک کنید.


Tangier

In May 1904, Ion Perdicaris, a wealthy American expatriate living in Tangier, was abducted from his sumptuous villa by Ahmed er Raisuli, "the last of the Barbary pirates." His kidnapping, writes Jonathan Broder, "set in motion an extraordinary international drama that would pit the might of the U.S. Navy against the wily Riffian bandit, secure Theodore Roosevelt's nomination for the Presidency and ultimately help him retain the White House." But above all, says Broder, "the Perdicaris affair would serve as a reminder of Tangier's power to taunt and tantalize the American imagination."

In 1777, Morocco, with its diplomatic capital in Tangier, became one of the first countries to recognize American independence. It also gave Americans their first taste of terrorism, helping to harbor the notorious Barbary pirates who raided U.S. ships, enslaved its citizens and eventually provoked America's first official foreign war. But by the turn of the century, Tangier's mercurial blend of beauty and barbarism had enticed a cadre of rich, adventuresome Americans like Perdicaris to make the sun-drenched, exotic city their second home. In the years that followed, Tangier would become a cauldron of espionage and international intrigue, a haven for smugglers and exiles, and a home for such American writers as Paul Bowles and William S. Burroughs, who transformed the city into the most celebrated expatriate colony of its time.

The symbol of America's historic fascination with Tangier is the old American Legation, a rambling 18th-century mansion inside the walls of the city's old quarter. Now a private museum and cultural center, the structure, a National Historic Landmark since 1981, is the longest-held American property on foreign soil. Over the years the legation building has sheltered consuls, both notable and notorious lions, both literal and literary and a host of renowned dignitaries, spies and expatriates, lured to the city by its strategic locale and compelling beauty.


HISTORY OF TANGIER

Few cities have had a more varied history than Tangier. Existing already as a Phoenician trading post in the middle of the 1st millennium BC, it later became Carthaginian the remains of a Carthaginian settlement Cotta can still be seen near Cape Spartel. In 81 BC the Roman general Quintus Sertorius captured the city (then known as Tingis) from the Mauretanian king Bocchus I. In 38 BC, during a round of Roman civil unrest, Tingis was taken on behalf of Octavian (the future emperor Caesar Augustus) by Bocchus II from his brother Bogud, who supported Octavian’s rival, Mark Antony. Becoming a free city in 42 AD, Tingis was made the capital of the Roman province of Mauretania Tingitana, with the name Tingis Colonia Julia Traducta, and it remained important commercially even after the political capital was removed to Volubilis.

After five centuries of Roman rule and a brief occupation by the Vandals in the 5th century, Tingis was captured by the Byzantine Empire in the 6th century. When the Arabs arrived in the 7th century, however, Ceuta, not Tangier, seems to have been their principal fortress on the strait. The Arab general Oqbah ibn Nafi (Sidi Okba) reached Tangier in 682 and from there raided deep into Morocco. In 707, when Moussa ibn Nosayr was appointed governor of North Africa, he had to reconquer Tangier the Amazigh (Berber) Ṭariq ibn Ziyad was appointed governor and in 711 launched an invasion of Spain, where his landing point, Gibraltar, still bears his name as a corruption of Jabal Ṭariq (Mount Ṭariq). In 951 Abd al-Raḥman III of Córdoba, the first caliph of the western Umayyad dynasty, annexed the city, and it remained under Muslim Spanish rule until the collapse of the caliphate about 80 years later. Under the Almoravids, Tangier became Moroccan again and despite a failed attempt to conquer the city by the Portuguese prince Henry the Navigator in 1437, it remained so until captured by the Portuguese in 1471.

In 1580 Tangier passed, with Portugal itself, to Spain it returned to independent Portugal in 1656. In 1662 it was transferred to the English crown as part of the dowry of Catherine of Braganza, wife of Charles II. The English put great hopes on this new possession, but, though a fine mole (breakwater) was built and a new fortification erected, the expense of maintaining the city against Moroccan attacks and the Protestant suspicion that it was a centre of Roman Catholicism caused it to be abandoned again in 1684. Since then it has remained a part of Morocco.

Tangier began to play a significant role in history again in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. At the end of the 18th century, a British consul and some 100 British citizens resided there and in the surrounding Tétouan region. During the siege of Gibraltar by the Spanish (1779–83), these Britons were expelled by the sultan. Tangier became the diplomatic capital of Morocco in the 19th century, and in 1845 Sir John Drummond Hay began his four-decade mandate there as British representative in Morocco throughout that period British trade and political influence predominated in the region.

In 1844 Tangier was bombarded by a French fleet as part of French campaigns against the Algerian emir Abdelkader. The Spanish then invaded Morocco in 1860, thus challenging a British policy aimed at preventing any Continental power from securing control of the southern shore of the Strait of Gibraltar. This situation led the British to issue a warning that a permanent Spanish occupation of Tangier or of the nearby Moroccan coast would not be permitted. About the same time, various foreign powers began to establish their own postal services, and in 1864 a lighthouse was established at Cape Spartel that was maintained by the consuls.

The result of these activities and privileges was that Tangier received an international regime of its own when the rest of the country became a French protectorate in 1912. Already in the proposed Franco-Spanish Agreement of 1902, the two powers had been willing to see the city eventually become neutral, and the Anglo-French Agreement of 1904 stipulated that Tangier should have a special status. This was confirmed at the Algeciras Conference (1906), a meeting that arose partly from calls for Morocco’s independence made by the German emperor William II during a visit to Tangier the previous year (these events were part of what came to be called the Moroccan crises). With the establishment of the French protectorate, a commission with French, Spanish, and British members was appointed to oversee the administration of Tangier, and by 1914 it had with difficulty agreed on certain recommendations. The outbreak of World War I necessitated fresh discussions, and a statute was not agreed upon until 1923. Five years later further modifications were introduced, with Great Britain, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Belgium, Sweden, Portugal, and Italy being recognized as the administering powers. This statute remained operative until June 1940, when Spain took advantage of the fall of France during World War II (1939–45) to occupy the zone in the name of the khalīfah of Tétouan and to impose a Spanish regime on the city. After the war the victorious Allies insisted on Spanish withdrawal, and in October 1945 the international administration was reestablished, with the participation of the United States Italy, an Axis country during the war, was readmitted later. With some minor modifications, the statute then remained in force until the independence of Morocco in 1956.


Tangier I SP-469 - History

In celebration of African American history this month, I’m sharing the link to an article I wrote for the current issue of Chesapeake Bay magazine. It’s adapted from my book, Star-Spangled, and tells the fascinating story of the Colonial Marines, formerly enslaved men who fought for the British during the War of 1812. Their base was on Tangier Island. In case you missed my blog post in 2019 about my visit there, here it is again. Tangier is truly a unique place in the United States. To read more about it, I recommend this book, Chesapeake Requiem.

Perhaps you’ve heard of Tangier Island since it has been in news stories about global warming. The tiny dot of land in the Chesapeake Bay, approximately 12 miles from the mainland, is only 4 feet above sea level. Its area has been eroding over the decades (67% reduction!) and today it is only 1.5 miles by 1.5 miles or so, an easy 15-minute drive around the perimeter on a golf cart!

I wanted to visit Tangier because I’ve been writing a book about the Battle of Baltimore and the Star-Spangled Banner. Tangier was a British base during the War of 1812 and became the site of Fort Albion.

The British commander in the Chesapeake, Rear Admiral George Cockburn, had been instructed to: “Find and get possession of some convenient island or point within the Chesapeake… which might serve as a place of refuge for the negro slaves from the surrounding shores.”

His superior, Vice Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane, had issued a proclamation in April 1814 announcing that escaped slaves were welcome with the British and promised them freedom and resettlement and, for fit, young men, an option of military service. This was not a humanitarian mission, they saw an opportunity to bolster their fighting forces. They formed the Colonial Marines, a regiment that would see battle at Washington, D.C., Baltimore and other sites. Four Colonial Marines were killed during the Battle of Baltimore.

Cockburn built a fort named for his flagship and the ancient name for England, Fort Albion. The community eventually included barracks, a church, a hospital, and houses with gardens. It became a temporary home for almost one thousand former enslaved people.

While I’d read that the site of Fort Albion is under water, I was curious to see the community and to find out if there are tangible remnants of the story. The island’s human history began with native groups, specifically the Pocomoke Indians. Its European history began with the arrival of Captain John Smith in 1608, a year after Jamestown was settled. The first settlers came around 1686. Many of today’s inhabitants trace their roots to settlers from the Cornwall region in England. Their distinct dialect fascinates linguists and is unlike anything I’d ever heard. I’ve walked across Cornwall, but it’s not quite the same accent as I heard there.

A small museum on the island does tell the story of the British occupation. I’m not sure how many settlers were on the island in 1814, but the British made themselves at home and built shelters for the refugees who escaped from the surrounding plantations. From Tangier, the Colonial Marines participated in a number of military engagements and impressed the British military leaders, who had low expectations at the start. With the signing of the Treaty of Ghent in 1815, the War of 1812 officially ended and the British evacuated the island, taking along the many refugees, who they sent to other British colonies such as Nova Scotia and Bermuda. Many of the Colonial Marines and their families ended up in Trinidad, where they settled into agricultural communities in their former divisions. They proudly identified as Americans and called themselves the “Merikans.”

Today, Tangier continues to scrape its existence from the surrounding bay, with industry focused on oysters and crabs. While there is nothing to see from the War of 1812 chapter in its history, the island is worth a visit to get a glimpse of a culture that has survived for hundreds of years in this remote post in middle of the glimmering bay.


Tangier History Museum

Learn about the unique history of this island. In 2010 Tangier Island got internet access and cable TV through a new microwave link. Before 1966 when Western Electric hooked up a wired telephone system they could only make and receive calls by 3 radio telephones on the island. Until Christmas 1947 residents only had intermittent direct current electrical power from local generators when the Rural Electrification Administration (REA) created the Chesapeake Islands Electric Cooperative with Smith Island and Tangier Island providing modern alternating current. It wasn’t until many years later that they were connected to the power grid and the generators were put into a backup capacity.

One of the more unusual attractions is hearing the unusual and old accent of the watermen. Because of the centuries of isolation, the islanders still speak in a unique island way that is similar to the speech spoken when Tangier Island was settled in 1686. It is still strong enough that some people say they cannot understand everything said.

Enjoy dropping off the face of the earth for a while. Even if you have some cell phone reception, turn it off and claim you don’t. It’s not Brigadoon but it’s likely the closest thing you will ever find.

Sadly the island is sinking. Channel dredging in the Chesapeake Bay could help save the island but it is being used to build up uninhabited islands in Maryland because of state boundaries. They also need a barrier wall to slow down the erosion.


Tangier Property

Tangier is located in community of Tangier, approximately 85 km northeast of Halifax.

Project Highlights

The Tangier gold Property (Property) is located in northeastern Nova Scotia, Canada. Gold was discovered on the Property in 1860 and since then, there have been several campaigns of mining in addition to which the Property has been explored by surface and underground exploration and drilling programs. Aurelius Minerals Inc. (Aurelius) acquired the Property on February 20, 2020. Cost to maintain the Tangier property in 2020 will include $12,860 in work commitments and $13,720 in renewal fees. Aurelius holds surface rights to the Property subject to an annual payment of $12,000 and a 1% net profits royalty from minerals produced up to a maximum of $1 million. The Property is not subject to any other known royalties, back-in rights, payments or other agreements and encumbrances. Aurelius does not hold any permits to conduct work on the Property and have no immediate plans to carry out any exploration or development.

There are no known environmental liabilities.

There are no known significant factors or risks that may affect access, title, or the right or ability of Aurelius to perform work on the Property.

Resource

A cutoff of 2 g/t gold was taken as the base case and is shown. Both capped (110 g/t Au) and uncapped grades are shown the uncapped grades are included to illustrate the impact of capping.

Class Tonnes Au g/t Capped Capped Ounces Au Uncapped Au g/t Oz Uncapped Au
Inferred 493,000 5.9 93,000 9.9 163,000

Mineral Resources are not Mineral Reserves and do not have demonstrated economic viability. There is no certainty that all or any part of mineral resources will be converted to mineral reserves. Inferred Mineral Resources are based on limited drilling which suggests the greatest uncertainty for a resource estimate and that geological continuity is only implied. Additional drilling will be required to verify geological and mineralization continuity and it is reasonably inferred that most of the inferred resources could be upgraded to indicated resources. Quantity and grades are estimates and are rounded to reflect the fact that the resource estimate is an approximation.

Geology

The Property is underlain by folded metagreywacke and interbeds of slate of the Goldenville Formation and is centered on the axis of the northeast-trending Tangier – Harrigan Cove Anticline. The Blueberry Hill area, the focus of most mining and exploration activity on the Property, is situated on an anticlinal dome that plunges to both the northeast and southwest. The limbs of the anticline dip at approximately 70 degrees to the north and south. The Property is cut by two sets northwest-trending faults those to the east are dextral with an aggregate horizontal offset of approximately 85 meters and those to the west are sinistral with an aggregate offset of approximately 150 meters.

Stratigraphically, the property is underlain by the Tangier Formation which is characterized by metagreywacke-dominated cycles fining upward into minor dark slate caps. A well-defined “mine stratigraphy” has been defined within the area of recent mining based on underground mapping and diamond drilling and is based on the recognition of bedding-parallel veins. Markers such as a distinct thick metagreywacke bed located above the Marker Vein are good stratigraphic markers at the Property scale. Slate beds range from a few centimetres to several metres in thickness, with most being less than one metre. In the mid-80s geologists mapped at least 30 bedding-parallel quartz veins that collectively extend from the west shore of Tangier Harbour to the Mooseland East area. Drilling and underground exploration in the Blueberry Hill area identified more than 30 additional veins between surface and a depth of approximately 300 meters. Diamond drilling carried out at Strawberry Hill, 1.5 kilometers east of the Blueberry Hill area, has intersected more than 30 bedding-parallel quartz veins. The Marker Vein, with its associated, distinctively thick greywacke marker bed, has been correlated between the two areas suggesting that the vein system extends between the two areas. The quartz veins are all contained within slate beds the veins commonly have developed preferentially on the hanging wall or footwall of the slate beds although there are many exceptions and some slate beds contain multiple veins.

Mineralization

Approximately 30 bedding-parallel quartz veins are reported that collectively extended from the east shore of Tangier Harbour for more than three km to the east. The most productive veins are on the south limb of the anticline. Drilling and underground exploration have subsequently encountered more than 30 additional veins between surface and a depth of approximately 300 meters. In addition to bedding-parallel veins, cross-cutting veins that occupy fold cleavages are also present. The bedding-parallel veins are all contained within thin slate beds within the thicker-bedded metagreywacke sequence. Slate beds commonly contain more than one quartz vein.

Auriferous veins commonly are bluish to greyish in colour and exhibit crack-seal textures. Milky-white quartz is also present, but its development appears to have post-dated the mineralizing event(s) and is generally barren. As noted, most auriferous veins are bedding-parallel, but gold has also been noted in cross-cutting veins associated with fold cleavage, although typically only where the cross-cutting veins intersect bedding parallel veins.

Gold occurs both in native form as flakes and threads, and in association with sulphides, primarily arsenopyrite, as well as carbonates and graphite.

The gold-bearing veins on the Tangier property have been traced by surface outcrops, drilling, and underground workings over a total strike length of approximately 3.4 km. The bulk of the drilling and the current resource estimate are limited to a strike length of approximately 500 m in the Blueberry Hill area of the project. Thus, the remaining 2.9 km of identified veins hold additional potential for mineralization with the Strawberry Hill area, where drilling has cut gold-bearing intervals in numerous quartz veins, having the most obvious potential for additional mineralization.

Ownership

The Company has a 100% interest in the property through its wholly owned subsidiary Aureus Gold Inc.


Tangier I SP-469 - History

Perhaps you’ve heard of Tangier Island since it has been in news stories about global warming. The tiny dot of land in the Chesapeake Bay, approximately 12 miles from the mainland, is only 4 feet above sea level. Its area has been eroding over the decades (67% reduction!) and today it is only 1.5 miles by 1.5 miles or so, an easy 15-minute drive around the perimeter on a golf cart!

I wanted to visit Tangier because I’ve been writing a book about the Battle of Baltimore and the Star-Spangled Banner. Tangier was a British base during the War of 1812 and became the site of Fort Albion.

The British commander in the Chesapeake, Rear Admiral George Cockburn, had been instructed to: “Find and get possession of some convenient island or point within the Chesapeake… which might serve as a place of refuge for the negro slaves from the surrounding shores.”

His superior, Vice Admiral Sir Alexander Cochrane, had issued a proclamation in April 1814 announcing that escaped slaves were welcome with the British and promised them freedom and resettlement and, for fit, young men, an option of military service. This was not a humanitarian mission, they saw an opportunity to bolster their fighting forces. They formed the Colonial Marines, a regiment that would see battle at Washington, D.C., Baltimore and other sites. Four Colonial Marines were killed during the Battle of Baltimore.

Cockburn built a fort named for his flagship and the ancient name for England, Fort Albion. The community eventually included barracks, a church, a hospital, and houses with gardens. It became a temporary home for almost one thousand former enslaved people.

While I’d read that the site of Fort Albion is under water, I was curious to see the community and to find out if there are tangible remnants of the story. The island’s human history began with native groups, specifically the Pocomoke Indians. Its European history began with the arrival of Captain John Smith in 1608, a year after Jamestown was settled. The first settlers came around 1686. Many of today’s inhabitants trace their roots to settlers from the Cornwall region in England. Their distinct dialect fascinates linguists and is unlike anything I’d ever heard. I’ve walked across Cornwall, but it’s not quite the same accent as I heard there.

A small museum on the island does tell the story of the British occupation. I’m not sure how many settlers were on the island in 1814, but the British made themselves at home and built shelters for the refugees who escaped from the surrounding plantations. From Tangier, the Colonial Marines participated in a number of military engagements and impressed the British military leaders, who had low expectations at the start. With the signing of the Treaty of Ghent in 1815, the War of 1812 officially ended and the British evacuated the island, taking along the many refugees, who they sent to other British colonies such as Nova Scotia and Bermuda. Many of the Colonial Marines and their families ended up in Trinidad, where they settled into agricultural communities in their former divisions. They proudly identified as Americans and called themselves the “Merikans.”

Today, Tangier continues to scrape its existence from the surrounding bay, with industry focused on oysters and crabs. While there is nothing to see from the War of 1812 chapter in its history, the island is worth a visit to get a glimpse of a culture that has survived for hundreds of years in this remote post in middle of the glimmering bay.


Along with his wife Jane Bowles, Paul lived on the top floor of El Muniria. The couple were legally married despite both of them being sexually fluid if not openly homosexual. During his Moroccan days, Paul wrote The Sheltering Sky quoted below.

Whereas the tourist generally hurries back home at the end of a few weeks or months, the traveler belonging no more to one place than to the next, moves slowly over periods of years, from one part of the earth to another. Indeed, he would have found it difficult to tell, among the many places he had lived, precisely where it was he had felt most at home.


Watch the video: جولة في المنار طنجة-Mnar Tanger (December 2022).

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